Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Are you the right client for me?

Triathlete looks for a coach but doesn't know WHAT they want. Triathlete talks to friends and social media (btw, everyone LOVES their coach). Triathlete HIRES a coach but feels to intimidated to ASK for what they want and need. Triathlete continues to PAY a coach who is not providing them with the information and skills that they want. Triathlete finishes season but doesn't feel SUCCESSFUL.

I often focus on teaching clients to ask themselves questions to determine what they are looking for in a coach. BUT as a coach, I'm looking for traits that make YOU a compatible client too. All coaches want their clients to be successful but many coaches are stretched thin with a long list of clients to serve. I select clients based on our ability to work together because I VALUE their commitment. My list of WANTS is short. 
  1. Consistency and Motivation
  2. Honesty (regarding availability, reasons for missing workouts, and workout results)
  3. No Frills (I don't do kits, tents, cheer squads, etc)
My goal in coaching is to provide an INDIVIDUAL and PROFESSIONAL plan for each client. I pride myself in providing HONEST feedback and PERSONAL attention to each client. I keep my roster short so that I have the resources to continually CHANGE and provide ONE-on-ONE assistance as needed. I hope to EDUCATE triathletes regarding skills, training periodization, injury prevention, strength development, and efficiency. 

Monday, April 10, 2017

Support Your Local Bike Shop

We live in a society where it is easy to compare prices and expect to receive goods/services quickly. I recently upgraded my bike with pedals for power at the bargain price of about $1200. Yes, I could have saved a few hundred dollars by purchasing through the internet but I chose to shop at my local bike shop. I knew the shop would be installing the equipment and I trusted them to take care of my bike.

After a couple of months of frustration due to reliability of connection, I decided that I didn't want the pedals. I had visited the shop several times to trouble shoot battery power and connectivity so they were familiar with my concerns. Because we had worked together, we were able to find a solution that included an exchange of the pedals for a hub based power meter.

I have been a loyal customer of my Local Bike Shop, LBS, since I started in triathlon in 2008. I have purchased bikes, received tune ups, and attended group rides and sponsored events. I continue to return because I NEED them to keep my bike in working order.  It's great to have a knowledgeable staff that is willing to listen to your issues, then work together to find a solution.

For those that purchase equipment and bikes then go to the LBS for fixes or warranty claims, shame on you. Why should the LBS show you loyalty and quick service when you didn't support them in the community?  Bottom line. When you support your LBS, you will receive friendship, knowledge, service, and maybe even enjoy a small discount for your loyalty!

Thanks to Northwest Cyclery and Jim Osbon for being my LBS and bike gurus!!!


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Puerto Rico 70.3 Race Report 2017

March 20, 2017
Total Time. 6:30.37

Travel to San Juan. 
We flew direct on Southwest on Thursday evening. The airport was about 20 minutes from the host hotel, Hilton Caribe, where we stayed. 

Pre-Race. 
Friday morning started with a practice swim in the lagoon. The water temperature was about 78 degrees and the lagoon doubles as a manatee sanctuary (we didn't see any). There was a current and some wind but nothing that seemed too strong. We attended the athlete briefing, led by the race director and head race official. Main discussion points included course maps, aid station contents, and a review of new rules. It's always nice to hear the highlights of the athlete guide but we also learned some tidbits that were useful (ie water bottles would likely not fit in bike cages, cobblestones on the run course could become slippery if it rains, etc). 

Swim. 38.01
The swim start was about .5 miles from transition. It was a water start with waves separated by 4 minutes. Buoys were on the right in a saltwater lagoon. During the athlete briefing, the race director mentioned that once swimmers passed the bridge, it would feel like an endless pool. After the practice swim that morning, I thought he was exaggerating. I quickly learned that I would have to work extra hard during that last 400 yards to the swim finish!
Bike. 3:13
My friend Pablo did the bike portion of the race. I ran about 1/2 mile from the swim finish to the transition to meet him. There was a tent in transition for relay teams to exchange the timing chip. The 2-loop course was windy and hot but mildly rolling hills. Pablo had a fl

at on the front wheel, near an aid station, where the mechanics quickly fixed it and he was back on the ride. He also dropped his chain, an issue that he thinks resulted from the rear derailleur getting bent during transport.

Run. 2:31
The run was a 2-loop course heading out to El Morro. The day had become hot and humid. I had been told that the run would prove to be a challenging course due to hilly terrain and cobblestones. By the start of the second loop, I had already consumed all my salt and had started using ice to cool down. I was thankful that I had decided to run with my hydration backpack, I needed every ounce of water. Although the course ran out of ice, it was replenished while I was still onsite. I was thankful for the spectators that provided hoses to help cool us down.


Transition 1. 4:44
Transition 2. 3:07

Monday, November 7, 2016

Oilman Aquabike 2016 Race Report

Outloud! does an excellent job putting on a top notch race. I have worked with the directors as a race official, spectator, and participant. They value the experience of each athlete and keep safety at the top of their priority list.

I arrived at the venue about 5:45am and parked in the dirt lot at the front entrance.  Definitely a hike to transition, the worst part of which is knowing that you will have to hike back after the race. Transition set up was easy and a large number of race officials were in transition.

The swim is historically wetsuit legal. I donned my gear and headed to the swim start. It is a beach entry into a protected cove before hitting the open water of the lake. Conditions were a bit windy but otherwise great racing weather. As an Aquabike, I was seeded in the last wave with the relays. My strategy was to start closer to the back half of the pack to attempt to let those fast relay swimmers get ahead. I chose a line that was closer to shore, less crowded, and what I thought was a shorter tangent to the first turn buoy. The open water was choppy with a cross-current. I was happy to have my wetsuit and worried about the weaker swimmers. Overall, had a good swim. I remained focused on my breathing and pacing, sighted the buoys well, and finished strong.

I utilized the wetsuit strippers, they are a Godsend! Entered transition one row too far but luckily, since I was in the last wave, I was able to dive under the racks to get to my gear. Did great on time and focused on getting out on the course as soon as possible.

My goal on the bike was to ride in less than 3:00 hours and push as hard as I could. I remember getting to mile 30, and thinking that it would be a great time to end my ride on a high note. I was anticipating the headwind that soon reared it’s ugly head. I know I did my best on the course, but I wished I had spent more time in specific preparation for the hills and distance.

I had a great effort on the course and in the race. I placed 4th in the women’s Aquabike, missed the mark by 3 minutes! Although I’m beating myself up for those THREE minutes, I honestly can say that I don’t think I could’ve given it more.


Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Kettle Bell Training

Why Kettle Bells?
Kettle Bells originated in Russia and have been dated back to the early 1800s. They are made of cast iron ball with a handle attached. Kettle Bell training will improve balance, power, and strength!
Top 5 Reasons to choose Kettle Bells
  1. Kettle Bell movements require power and strength. The dynamic exercises will tighten and tone your whole body.
  2. Kettle Bell movements challenge your balance through the shifting of your center of gravity. You engage stabilizing muscles to control the momentum generated by changing directions of the kettle bell.
  3. Kettle Bell movements will develop forearm and grip strength. No matter how heavy, if you can't grip it you can't lift it!
  4. Kettle Bell training bridges the gap between building strength and gaining cardio-respiratory fitness. By virtue of the “swing” your heart rate will increase creating that calorie burn!
  5. Kettle Bell training is considered “functional training” because it requires coordination, mobility, and balance while completing the movement.

Exercises:
  • Around the World- Warm Up (shoulders, core, posture, coordination, grip strength) Single bell.  Stand tall, tight belly, switching hands. Both directions.
  • Upright Row- Warm Up (shoulders, core) Single bell. Stand tall. Hands on the horns. Lead with the elbows.
  • Overhead Press- Warm Up (shoulders, core, balance) Single bell. Stand tall with abdominals engaged. Hands on the bell with thumbs through the horn, upside down. Press over head with arm extension.
  • Goblet Squat with Bicep Curl and Overhead Press- Full Body (legs, biceps, shoulders, core, balance) Single bell. Hold bell tight to chest with hands on the horns. Squat down, keeping elbows in close, perform a curl and return to standing with chest tall. Then press bell overhead keeping the core tight to support the back from extension.
  • Swings – Foundation (back, shoulders, hamstrings, glutes) Single bell, two hands on horn. Flat back, hinge from hips then thrust hips forward when swinging arms to shoulder height.
  • Lunge with Row (legs, glutes, back, balance, core) Single bell. Split stance with alternate arm parallel to the floor. With a flat back, lunge down. Press up and row simultaneously.
  • Overhead Tricep Press (balance, triceps, core) Single bell, two hands on horn. Press bell overhead, stabilize elbows in line with wrist and shoulder. Hinge from the elbow to the back of the head and press up. Careful to keep the back supported from extension. Increase intensity by balancing on 1 leg. 
  • Around the World Stall- (core, shoulders, balance) Single bell, single hand. Swing kettle bell behind, switch hands and around to the front. Use the starting hand to push the bell back in the direction it originated switching hands behind the body.

There are a variety of exercises that can be performed using the kettle bell. I encourage you to seek a professional to expand your exercise library to include clean, snatch, get ups, and more! 

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Register NOW. Cypress Creek YMCA is offering small group triathlon training on MWF at 5:15-6:15am starting September 12- November 18, 2016. Price is $49 for members and $149 for non-members. Goal race will be the Fairfield Triathlon on October 23, 2016.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Create a Gym Routine

1. Pick a time in your day that works best for YOU to CONSISTENTLY go to the gym. Don’t worry about all the “this is the best time to train” theories; just pick a time in your day that you know works for YOU and your schedule.
2. GO…just go to the gym, even if you are a little tired or not interested in working out that day. GO, and this may be the only time I say this, but go through the motions of your daily routine. If that means you get home from work, eat, and go to the gym…DO IT. It’s not so much about that day’s workout but rather training your mind to realize this is your new routine and lifestyle. Remember, we want this to become a routine for LIFE for you, not something that you just tried once.
3. When you get to the gym, especially if you are new, don’t worry about killing every workout, or PR-ing every exercise. You will over do it and NOT want to go back the next day. Instead, take your time, go inside, do a 5 minute warm-up and stretch, put on a playlist you like, then start your workout. Have a routine once in the gym and don’t skip it!
4. Try to make your scheduled gym days as much as possible! The more times you go through this routine, the better chance you will have at making your routine STICK. Remember fitness is not about perfection, it’s about consistency over time. Therefore, the LONGER you can keep going to the gym, the better position you will be in to make fitness part of your everyday lifestyle, even if it has never been before.